The association between consuming dairy products and cancer risks has been the focus of much research in the past few years. This is partly due to the fact that several global regions do not eat any milk products yet do not have nutrient deficiencies (such as calcium) in spite of this, and because of “contemporary nutrition” attitudes that humans aren’t meant to consume milk after weaning, like all other mammals.
 
A study published in late October wanted to find out the results of eating dairy on a very wide spectrum of people from different countries. Researchers from Singapore analyzed data from 11 different populations involving 778,929 individuals. They estimated their findings according to the relative risks of the person to get cancer, the regions they came from, their gender, the dairy types and amounts consumed.
 
They found that total intake of dairy products (including milk, yogurt, cheese, butter) was not associated in general with all types of cancer risks in men and women. However, men drinking even one serving a day of whole milk had significantly elevated prostate cancer risks (and mortality from it), and the more milk men drank, the higher their risks.
 

 (Wei Lu, Hanwen Chen, Dajing Xia, Yihua Wu, “Dairy products intake and cancer mortality risk…”, Nutrition Journal, 201615:91, October 21, 2016, Singapore)

COMMENTS


There are no comments.